Healing Through Pictures

A Healing Journey Through PTSD, Anxiety, and Depression One Picture At A Time

Archive for the tag “Shel Silverstein”

Inside the Giving Tree

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When I went to check on the egg in the Giving Tree I heard, click, click, click. I thought it was the egg hatching, so I took a quick picture with my Iphone.

Nope, not the eggs hatching. I noticed it was Mama, telling me to go away.

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Secrets of the Giving Tree

I have mentioned before our “Giving Tree” is diseased and dying.  Today I went out and took a picture of a knot whole.  I remember well the limb that used to come out of this knot.  It was my position to sit as a child, straddling it.  This very spot was where most of my adventure played out.   I was very said for my tree.  Today,  I realized that it must be the heart of the tree.  You will understand why.

Giving Tree hole 6-7

As I leaned in closer to take pictures I saw a pecan and thought that is the neatest thing in the world.  Squirrels are using the tree as a secret hide away to store food.

hole in the giving tree 6-7

The nut tucked is way in the back so you could not see it in this picture.  When I looked at the next image on the screen my eyes filled with tears.

Safe in the giving tree 6-7What I thought was a pecan, was not a pecan at all.  It was a tiny bird egg.  Yes, safe in the Giving Tree protected from harm.  Rest safe little one.  Your mom chose wisely. You have very special first home.

 

The Giving Tree

The Giving Tree 6-5-1The Giving Tree

I hope to get a better picture of our climbing tree, this makes it look short. (I added the larger picture today.)  I lovingly think of it as “The Giving Tree” as Shel Silvertein talked about in his children’s book.  Mimosa’s typically only live about 17 years.  Our mimosa has lived 45 + years.

I know that is because the love we give it, and it gives in return.  Many an adventure have been lived out in this tree.  It was a boat, a castle, a home, a school bus, a school, a space ship, and anything a child’s mind could imagine.  His sturdy limbs once even saved us from a neighborhood dog attack.  As Granny yelled, “run to the climbing tree” when a Doberman jumped the fence.

Several generations have climbed it.  When I was 19 and broke up with my first very serious marriage talking boyfriend, I went and climbed this tree and cried.  When I moved back home after being gone for three years, one of the first things I did was climb the tree.   I could not get as high as I once could, but I could still climb it.  He has a disease now; but he still blooms year after year.  When the grandchildren come, they still visit him.  I love this tree!

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